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Travel Health and Insurance

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Personal Health Information & Disclosure

International Medical and Security Evacuation Insurance

Using the CISI Policy

Trip Insurance vs. Medical Insurance

Travel Immunizations

Mental and Emotional Health

Over the Counter & Prescription Medications

Taking Care of Yourself Onsite

Food and Water Quality Abroad

Dating & Sexual Activity

Personal Health Information & Disclosure

Before departure, you must complete the Learning Abroad: Travel Health Questionnaire and the Office for Global Engagement Health Clearance Form. These are integrated into the post-decision steps of your U of U application.  To complete this requirement, take the following steps:

health process

These steps must be completed by the following deadlines:

  • Academic Year/Fall: June 15th
  • Fall Break: August 1st
  • Calendar Year/Spring/Spring Break/Winter Break: December 15th
  • Summer: April 15th

Health information will NOT be considered as part of the admissions decision for your Program.   If you are accepted to the Program, this information is made available in a confidential manner to the individuals and organizations facilitating the Program.  During an emergency, this is the University’s primary source of information to help you with.

If you need to request accommodations related to a disability, please see the Diversity section of the Learning Abroad Handbook.
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International Medical and Security Evacuation Insurance

You are required to have the University’s international insurance.  The insurance policy is provided through Cultural Insurance Services International (CISI). Among other benefits, the policy includes coverage for medical evacuation, repatriation of remains, and evacuation support in the event of a natural disaster or political upheaval. Detailed information about the policy is available in CISI’s on-line portal or in the policy brochure.  Please note the following:

  • You will automatically be registered for this coverage before departure.
  • An email with instructions and your insurance card will be sent to your Umail.
  • The cost of this policy is included in the Billable cost of your Program. The cost will automatically be charged to your student account.
  • The policy covers the official Program dates. You can extend the policy to cover independent travel outside of your Program dates.  It is your responsibility to secure and pay for policy extensions.
  • Coverage may be available for dependents. Contact the Office for Global Engagement for more information. 

For details on using insurance policy, see Using the CISI Policy.

CISI 2017 & 2018 Calendar Year Rates*

Beginning January 1, 2018, you will be charged $10 per week for the CISI insurance coverage.  Rates for 2017 are found in the chart below.  CISI Rates are an estimate and are subject to change each year on January 1st.

2017 Rates

*RATE
DURATION
$39.25 1 MONTH
$78.50 2 MONTHS
$117.75 3 MONTHS
$157.00 4 MONTHS
$196.25 5 MONTHS
$235.50 6 MONTHS
$274.75 7 MONTHS
$314.00 8 MONTHS
$353.25 9 MONTHS
$392.50 10 MONTHS
$431.75 11 MONTHS
$471.00 12 MONTHS
 

 

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Using the CISI Policy

Instructions for using the CISI policy and important contact information are found in this handout.  CISI may be able to pay for medical expenses up front.  If you pay for service out-of-pocket, you will need to submit a claim to CISI.  CISI will review the claim and determine if it is reimbursable.  Itemized receipts are required to obtain a reimbursement.  CISI works with AXA Assistance to provide 24/7 referrals and support to travelers.

For Non-Emergency Treatment-

For non-emergency treatment, following the steps below:

  1. Call AXA Assistance to open a case. Using the information on your insurance card, open a case with AXA Assistance using the 24/7 contact information below.  They will need your policy number to open the case.  A copy of the policy and your card can be found in the myCISI Participant Portal.

AXA Assistance Phone:

312-935-1703 (calling from outside the US, 24-7)
855-327-1411 (calling toll-free from within the US, 24-7)

Email:

medassist-usa@axa-assistance.us

 

  1. Follow the instructions and receive care. AXA Assistance will identify the best care facility and provide you with instruction.   
  2. Submit a claim for reimbursement (if applicable). Take your insurance information and ID card with you to the healthcare facility.  If CISI does not have a direct-bill relationship with the facility, you may be required to provide payment for services.  Be sure to keep receipts and submit a claim for reimbursement after your appointment. 

During an Emergency

For all emergency situations, use the steps below:

  1. Seek help immediately. In an emergency, seek help before opening a case.
  2. Call AXA Assistance to open a case as soon as possible. Using the information on your insurance card, open a case with AXA Assistance using the 24/7 contact information below.  They will need your policy number to open the case.  A copy of the policy and your card can be found in the myCISI Participant Portal.  You can also contact the University to open the case on your behalf.
  3. Follow the instructions provide by AXA Assistance. AXA Assistance will work with the treatment facility to manage your case.
  4. Submit a claim for reimbursement (if applicable). Take your insurance information and ID card with you to the healthcare facility.  If CISI does not have a direct-bill relationship with the facility, you may be required to provide payment for services.  Be sure to keep receipts and submit a claim for reimbursement after your appointment. 

AXA Assistance Phone:

312-935-1703 (calling from outside the US, 24-7)
855-327-1411 (calling toll-free from within the US, 24-7)

Email:

medassist-usa@axa-assistance.us

Trip Insurance vs. Medical Insurance

Trip insurance is different than medical insurance.

  • Medical insurance covers medical emergencies abroad.
  • Trip insurance can reimburse you for unforeseen travel changes such as flight delays, theft, trip cancellation, etc.

The University of Utah does NOT provide trip insurance. You can purchase a trip policy through an insurance agent or a travel agent. Verify whether or not "acts of God" are covered. This may impact the benefits for weather-related issues or if the Program is canceled due to a natural disaster.

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Travel Immunizations

You may need immunizations for your Program.  It is your responsibility to identify and obtain necessary immunizations before departure. Keep the following in mind:

  • The Center for Disease Control (CDC) provides for country-specific health and immunization information.
  • Some immigration officers require proof that you received your travel immunizations. This is common with the yellow fever vaccination.
  • Some immunizations require 3 - 6 months to complete. Contact your doctor immediately to begin the process.
  • Your family physician may not be able to give you travel immunizations. Options for obtaining travel immunizations are found below.  You will need an appointment in advance.  When making the appointment, ask about any required paperwork that you will need.

Salt Lake City, UT

University of Utah Asia Campus

University of Utah International Travel Clinic
50 N Medical Drive, Clinic 1A
Salt Lake City, Utah 84132
(801) 585-2031

University of Utah Student Health Center (Offers student rates on immunizations)
555 Foothill Blvd.

Madsen Health Center, Level 1
Salt Lake City, UT 84112
Tel: (801) 581-6431

Salt Lake Valley Health Department International Travel Clinic
2001 S. State St., Ste. S2400
Salt Lake City, UT 84190
(801) 468-2813

Visa Physical Section, Yonsei University Health System

50-1, Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 03722

Tel: 02 2228 5815

NOTE: ONLY make an appointment with Dr. Hyewon Min.  The University does not accept forms completed by doctors who are not licensed in the United States.

 

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Mental and Emotional Health

Healthy travels include mental and emotional well-being. Experiencing another culture is exciting, but is also disorienting and often results in culture shock. Be aware of the following:

  • Culture shock can increase the symptoms of mental and emotional health conditions or initiate a relapse. You should expect to have some culture shock and homesickness during your Program.
  • Struggling with culture shock is normal, but you do not have to face this alone. If you feel overwhelmed, reach out to Program staff for help.
  • If you have a history of mental or emotional health conditions, disclose this information in your U of U Application. This information will help us support you onsite.
  • The Peace Corps has fantastic resources to help you prepare for, understand, and manage culture shock.
  • There are also on campus resources to assist you with mental and emotional health:

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Over the Counter & Prescription Medications

The availability of over-the-counter and prescription medications varies.  It is your responsibility to ensure that you have access to medications and supplies abroad. For over-the-counter medications, you should pack a “homemade first aid kit” so that you have basic supplies.  The CDC has an excellent first aid packing list.  For prescription medications, follow the guidelines below.

  • Pack enough medication to last your entire Program.
  • Keep the medication in the original, labeled containers with your name, doctor’s name, and name of the medication.
  • Ask your healthcare provider about refilling prescriptions abroad.
  • Know the generic names of your prescriptions.  In the event of an emergency, this will help you communicate with medical personnel.
  • Pack all prescription medication in your CARRY-ON LUGGAGE.
  • If you use injections, take an adequate supply of well-labeled syringes.  You may need an official letter from your doctor to take injections on a plane.
  • Take an extra pair of glasses and a copy of your prescription. Take enough contact lens solution for the duration of your Program.

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Taking Care of Yourself Onsite

Travel, time changes, new climates, and new foods can weaken your immune system. Get plenty of rest and eat properly. Dehydration is common for travelers.  Drink lots of water. If you feel unwell, contact your Faculty Director, Program Staff, or CISI. They can help you obtain medical care abroad.

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Food and Water Quality Abroad

Food and water quality outside of the United States can vary greatly. These variations can cause medical problems for you during your travels. Research the water quality of your destination before departure. Your Faculty Director or the staff at one of the local travel clinics can provide advice if you are unsure. Many guide books also provide insights into water quality. If the water quality is questionable, drink bottled water and ask for drinks without ice cubes. You might consider using bottled water to brush your teeth as well.

Make sure that all food is well cooked. Fruits and vegetables should be thoroughly washed and peeled. Be especially careful when eating food prepared by street vendors or food carts. The general rule of thumb from travel experts is: If you can’t cook it or you can’t peel it, don’t eat it!

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Dating & Sexual Activity

There are cultural differences associated with dating and sexual activity.  Partners abroad may have different expectations of you. Gestures, clothing, eye contact, and body language can be interpreted differently. Depending on the host culture, your behavior may be perceived as provocative or overly aggressive. Additionally, casual topics of conversation in one culture may be considered sexual encouragement in others. Be sure to socialize in groups and remove yourself from any situation that makes you uncomfortable.

The prevalence of AIDs, HIV, and other STIs may be higher abroad, and the understanding of how diseases are spread or prevented may be limited. Before engaging in sexual activity, consider potential health risks and use appropriate precautions. Forms of protection may be difficult to find in the host country. Be sure to take supplies with you. Contact your health care provider for specific recommendations.

Last Updated: 5/16/17